KIVU Gap Year Deadline

We, here at the KIVU Gap Year, are excited for what’s going on in this current class.  I just spent some time in January with the students in Israel and Palestine, and the questions we are helping students navigate verge on the incredible.

From the beginning of the Gap Year, we are focused on a few tenable goals for students to engage with.

  1. Who are you? – We want students to own who they are at the core level.  We want them to ask hard questions about how they see the world.  We want to challenge them to “know” and “be known” in a community of fellow journeymen so that; when they enter the University setting or the Workplace, they can stand up for who they are.  Our colleagues call this Emotional Intelligence.  Or EQ.
  2. How can you develop Community? – On the travels around the world, we introduce students to a variety of people groups.  They encounter people that think like them AND people that think different.  We encourage students to be able to have a viable discourse where they can disagree with civility, and develop a community of friends and colleagues that can stand strong on being human.
  3. What is your gift? – We believe each student has a fire inside them waiting to be fanned into flame.  We utilize the relationships we have around the world to introduce students to a broad base of potential ways they can engage.  We want to intentionally engage students in a way where they can find their own passion for what lies before them.

The time I spent walking with the students abroad was so encouraging.  While we visited some of the oldest sites in the world and met with some of the most interesting people; students continually asked Who, How, and What.

If you’re interested in coming on the adventure around the world, please know MARCH 1  is an application deadline to join the class of 2019.  Be sure to visit the website and fill out the inquiry at http://www.kivugapyear.com and one of our qualified staff will guide you through the process.

We’re looking forward to seeing how we can serve you on your time building your CV, learning about you, and exploring the world.

 

Three Questions for Parents

As we travel to explain the Gap Year concept, we find students understand the idea pretty quickly.  They have an un-tapped wanderlust they want to experience.  They understand academic burn out.  They know they want to explore the world in new ways.

But sometimes Parents have important questions for this relatively “new” industry.

In this week’s podcast, Andy Braner tries to answer the top three questions we get here at the KIVU Gap Year from Parents

  1. How is there such diversity among Gap Year costs?
  2. Is a Gap Year Safe?
  3. Will my student go back to College after returning from a Gap Year?

Feel free to listen in on some important answers here on the podcast.  OR, you can stay up to date on all The KIVU Gap Year podcasts by subscribing on iTunes.

The Link to the Podcast

Here is this week’s episode

Gap Year’s For Todays Students

As the world continues to get smaller through our intentional technology revolution, students are going to be hard pressed to connect with different cultures, different world views, and the ability to connect with different thought processes.

Different Cultures

There’s little debate concerning the globalization of today’s companies.  Most of the top U.S. companies have a footprint of business, education, or at the very least a social impact on different countries around the world.

In today’s Secondary Education climate, very few of our students are being exposed to the ways to form successful small groups where the diversity of culture has to be addressed to actually accomplish a common goal.

On the KIVU Gap Year, we have taken the task of exposing students to various cultures both here in America, and across the world.

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Our student shave the chance to stay with local families in foreign countries.  Whether they have a stay in Africa, Peru, Bolivia, or the Jordan, students have the chance to learn cultural diversity to give them a chance to understand future potential cultural relationships no matter where they intend on spending their vocational time.  Our intent is to help students understand what it means to deal with different expectations dependent on cultural diversity, and we’re actually seeing their worlds get smaller and smaller.

They are able to talk about politics, social differences, and see opportunities to connect America to different parts of the world.  This is vital as we see a generation of students whose world continues to shrink as they forge ahead to live and work in places with high degrees of cultural diversity.

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Different World Views

It’s safe to say with 7 Billion people on planet earth, there are almost as many different world views students need to learn how to navigate.  Values that matter include…

Where they were born
What values were important to their families
What faith components they believe in
What social values are high on the list of their world

Each way our environment speaks into who we are dictates what lens we see the world through.  Traditionally, America has a reputation of seeing the world through the lens of the last great super power.  So the questions begin to rise quickly to the surface

What is my role in the world as an American Citizen?
How do I interact with other countries and how they see the world?
What is my role in understanding someone else’s world view, and being able to value my own way of thinking?

As more and more students are leaving home to attend University life, it’s imperative they are able to navigate their own worldview in the confluence of world views they will be exposed to, even right there at home.

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Different Social Impact

In America, we have two oceans on either side of our country that insulate much of our thinking from the rest of the world.  In Africa, it’s normal to see a high social value given to the family, while our sense of family may vary from region to region.

In the Middle East there are different social norms put on gender, where here in America we strive to create equality the name of the gender game.

In South America, there are certain social ways of interacting with a culture long created by the colonization of the European Catholic societies mixed with the native groups.  While here in America, there is an amalgam of cultures all trying to live and work together in a “melting pot” that centers on the question of What does it mean to be American?

As students are exposed to different social norms, we invite them to explore the reasons why societies are different, and how they can integrate in those social groups depending on their circumstances.

All in all, when a student Graduates from the KIVU Gap Year, they are equipped with the tools to help them with Different Global Cultures, Different Global World views, and Different Social implications no matter where they live and work.